Columns

While visiting Ceasarea (see former posts Ceasarea, Roman Amphitheater and Roman Aqueduct), I turned to the south and noticed the massive columns of an electrical power plant framed by the two Roman columns.  This is Israel's largest power plant, located on the Mediterranean Sea about 50 miles north of Tel Aviv. The columns of Ceasarea have been … Continue reading Columns

Roman Aquaduct

Fresh water was supplied to the bustling city of Ceasarea via this aquaduct built by the Romans around the time of Christ.  Water comes from a spring near the base of Mt. Carmel, about eight miles north. Imagine the engineering and planning it took to build this magnificent structure.  The water flows by gravity alone, … Continue reading Roman Aquaduct

Roman Amphitheater

One of the main attractions at Ceasarea is the Roman Theater; it presently seats 3,600 for summer concerts and performances. Only a few rows of the original stone seats remain (see photo at left).  It is a gorgeous venue, looking out over the Mediterranean Sea, surrounded by the antiquities of Ceasarea. While the structure was magnificent, I … Continue reading Roman Amphitheater

Ceasarea

Construction of Ceasarea began in 22 BC.  A large sea port, amphitheater, hippodrome, palaces, temples and marketplace was built by King Herod the Great in only 12 years. Herod named it Ceasarea after his patron Augustus Ceasar; it covers 164 acres and eventually populated to over 100,000. After Herod's death, Ceasarea became the headquarters of Rome's … Continue reading Ceasarea