Chagga Banana

Chagga Banana The predominant tribe around Mount Kilimanjaro in northern Tanzania is the Chagga. Except for a few Maasai, most of the people I met with during my two week visit were Chagga. One of the highlights of the trip was a dinner hosted by the Bishop of the Northern Diocese, Dr. Frederick Shoo, an … Continue reading Chagga Banana

Hops

Maasai Jump Dance The Maasai tribe met us outside their compound. The drums were loud, the women were dancing and chanting with an occasional high-pitched scream, and the men were hopping around like kangaroos. From a standing position the men would launch themselves high in the air and dramatically land flat footed like they were … Continue reading Hops

Endless Plain

Serengeti Plain The Serengeti Plain in Northern Tanzania covers 12,000 square miles, about the size of the state of Maryland. Travel photos and movies showing African landscape typically depict a savannah, which is a mosaic of woodland and grassland, scattered with the iconic flat-topped Acacia (umbrella tree). About one-third of the Serengeti is grassland like … Continue reading Endless Plain

Repurposed Tires

The Maasai are a semi-nomadic tribe that move their livestock within ever-shrinking grazing rights of Northern Tanzania and Kenya. Descendants of a fierce warrior nation, today's Maasai are peaceful and friendly except when it comes to their cattle. They are easily recognized by their brightly-colored one-piece garments known as kanga, red being a favored color, but blue is also … Continue reading Repurposed Tires

Ngorongoro Crater

Mt. Ngorongoro was the size of Mt. Kilamanjaro until it blew its top three million years ago, covering the Serengeti Plain with volcanic ash.  The mountain collapsed into itself leaving the largest intact volcanic caldera in the world.  The crater rim is 7,500' above sea level and 12 miles in diameter; 2,000' below, the wooded slopes give … Continue reading Ngorongoro Crater