Machame Hospital

Machame Hospital - Motorcycle Ward Machame Hospital, near Moshi Tanzania, has been in operation since 1906, when German missionary doctor, Dr. Herman Ploetze, arrived. It has grown to a 230 bed facility owned by the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Northern Diocese, and treats over 150 outpatients daily. Cheaply made Chinese motorcycles driven by risk-immune … Continue reading Machame Hospital

Eager Learners

Uduru Preschoolers Happy children, learning how to socialize, follow rules, cooperate with others, satisfy their curiosity and expand their knowledge. These are students of the Uduru Parish Preschool near Moshi, Tanzania; dressed in the uniform purple sweater, some with matching hats and others wearing hats of the Tanzanian flag colors. Today there are over sixty … Continue reading Eager Learners

Threshing Beans

Threshing Beans Agricultural labor is mostly done by hand in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania. Tractors are becoming more noticeable, but still rare. It is not uncommon to see large fields being hoed by 8-10 men, using primitive-looking hoes with large heads and roughly hewn handles. Here beans are being threshed by hand. Dried bean … Continue reading Threshing Beans

Balloons

Neema Orphanage Children in this Tanzanian orphanage remove their shoes and stack them neatly outside the door before entering their living quarters. After the initial wave of hysteria over the balloons, the children settled down and waited patiently for their care givers to blow up a balloon for each of them. The plaque below the … Continue reading Balloons

New Friend

I met this little guy by accident, searching for the choo (toilet) behind a children's center in Moshi, Tanzania. He was alone, but I could hear distant sounds of a preschool classroom. His face was full of questions, but smiled when I greeted him in Swahili. Bashful, yet engaging, he didn't try to speak. I … Continue reading New Friend

Mt. Kilimanjaro

Mt. Kilimanjaro I just returned from two weeks in Tanzania. With the exception of a five-day safari, I was on the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, and was fortunate to see the mountain's top on several days. This is the view from the hotel balcony where I stayed for six nights. Thought for the Day: In … Continue reading Mt. Kilimanjaro

Going Bananas

Market Day Market Day is the busiest day of the week in the small village of Mwiki, Tanzania. Farmers bring their produce, and merchants bring their wares. Bananas are the most popular food item traded at the market. Just about anything you think of can be found at this open air market. Grains, fruit and … Continue reading Going Bananas

Crater

Ngorongoro Crater A few gazillion years ago a volcano blew its top off. Given the size of the crater today, 11 miles across and 2,000' deep, the mountain was taller than Mount Kilimanjaro, the world's tallest free standing mountain and just a few miles away in Northern Tanzania. It is the most intact caldera in … Continue reading Crater

Winning Smile

AIDs and malaria are the primary cause of Tanzanian orphans. Orphaned children are typically taken in by other family members; the orphanage is a last resort. The orphanage keeps hair short for maintenance and hygienic reasons so the only way to tell girls from boys is the skirts they wear. Visitations from mission groups are … Continue reading Winning Smile

Ephraim D. Muro

I met Ephraim D. Muro in early 2016 during a mission trip to Moshi, Tanzania.  Standing in line for a pot luck dinner at his church, he insisted that I go first, which then became a point of respectful disagreement.  Knowing how age was so respected in their culture, I was somewhat offended that he … Continue reading Ephraim D. Muro

Happiness

Webster's definition of happiness is: 1: good fortune: prosperity  2: a: a state of well-being and contentment: joy b: pleasurable satisfaction. The first definition, "good fortune: prosperity" contradicts everything I was taught as a child; i.e. money doesn't bring happiness.  The second definition more aptly matches my value system; i.e. contentment and well-being come from … Continue reading Happiness

Learning to Count

A bright young girl in Uduru Lutheran Parish's preschool shows the teacher she can count to 100.  Located near Moshi, Tanzania, this typical preschool relies on the church, volunteers and donations to prepare their youngsters for primary school. The four year old students were so quiet and patient, I marveled at the teacher's control of the … Continue reading Learning to Count

School’s Out

On a morning walk near Moshi, Tanzania I could hear young children's excited voices.  Several kids were running toward me from both directions, all with big smiles on their faces.  Soon, I was surrounded by a dozen boisterous youngsters, all dressed in the same school jersey, all with such uninhibited joy -- like school was … Continue reading School’s Out

Hay Market

Many forms of transportation are used in Tanzania, everything from donkey carts to large trucks.  Walking is probably the most common, followed by cheaply made Chinese motorcycles. Bicycles are very popular too.  On a major highway leading out of Moshi, a large city of 185,000, I noticed many men moving hay with their bicycles.  Whatever … Continue reading Hay Market

Giving Thanks

This 4-5 year old is proudly wearing the uniform of the Uduru Parish preschool; hat and jersey/sweater using colors of the Tanzanian  flag, with a patch of the flag shown on the hat.  The jersey is several sizes too big for him, probably a hand-me-down from an older sibling, but in very good condition. By … Continue reading Giving Thanks

Agape Jr. Seminary

Agape Lutheran Junior Seminary is located on the eastern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro in northern Tanzania, just over the hill from Kenya.  It is a private school, known for its high academic standards. The school is well maintained, neat and clean, with relatively modern dormitories.   The school's director is a no-nonsense person who expects, … Continue reading Agape Jr. Seminary

Serengeti Stand Off

I was in Serengeti National Park in northern Tanzania, perched on top of a high bank watching a hippo pool below.  The small river flowed toward me straight out of the northern horizon, made a left turn at my feet and headed east.  Several hippo families were lazing in the river's elbow. The 6,000 lb hippo came … Continue reading Serengeti Stand Off

Chaga House

The Chaga people are the third largest ethnic group in Tanzania.  They are found in the northeast part of Tanzania, on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro, near the town of Moshi. Look closely, Mount Kilimanjaro is peaking above the clouds in this photo. In Chaga tradition, their houses are round, built without any corners.  Families are … Continue reading Chaga House

Repurposed Tires

The Maasai are a semi-nomadic tribe that move their livestock within ever-shrinking grazing rights of Northern Tanzania and Kenya. Descendants of a fierce warrior nation, today's Maasai are peaceful and friendly except when it comes to their cattle. They are easily recognized by their brightly-colored one-piece garments known as kanga, red being a favored color, but blue is also … Continue reading Repurposed Tires

Affordable Transportation

Bicycles are a common mode of transportation in Tanzania.   Motorcycles and cars are common in big cities, but are impractical and too expensive in the rural areas. I found this bike parked behind one of the buildings at the Hai Vocational School.  I suspect it was owned by one of the instructors, as the … Continue reading Affordable Transportation